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  • It’s an interesting idea but not exactly sure what would be in it for us as a club.

    Industrial tourism always sounds good on the surface, but would time spent at a Ligue 2 academy really benefit our youngsters, apart from learning some french?

    Unless there is some type of feeder relationship being discussed.
  • Should the partnership actually happen, provided it is set up in line with existing financial parameters it can only be of benefit to the Swans and Lorient especially if the criteria is as indicated in the following link.

     https://www.ljmu.ac.uk/research/centres-and-institutes/research-institute-for-sport-and-exercise-sciences/expertise/the-football-exchange

    Two seasons ago Swansea University hosted 60 Chinese football coaches in collaboration with the Swans and the Welsh Football Trust during their three-month stay in South Wales where coaches gained various football coaching qualifications through both the FAW Trust and Swansea City AFC, also partaking in English language training alongside a series of sports science modules focusing on psychology, biomechanics, anatomy and fitness testing.

    https://www.swansea.ac.uk/press-office/news-archive/2018/swanseauniversityplayshosttochinesefootballcoacheswiththehelpofswanseacityandfawtrust.php
  • Still can’t see what the value is for our academy students. It sounds really nice and great to meet people from a different culture, but how will it make our young players better footballers!
  • Can we get our young players experience in the French leagues via a loan system? Can we get first dibs on the best talent coming through their academy?
  • Are we as a nation that big-headed we don't believe there is anything our academy coaches and scholars can learn from the approach and methodology other countries adopt in improving the standard and quality of young footballers. Isn't Belgium one such example where a country with a population of around 11M has become a magnet for the top clubs in the last fifteen years for player recruitment through changes made in coaching strategy nearly 20 years ago. 

    https://www.theguardian.com/football/blog/2014/jun/06/belgium-blueprint-gave-birth-golden-generation-world-cup-

    Are we to just accept that academy cat 1 status is the be and end all for educating youngsters and coaches in this country yet when it comes to playing equivalent sized countries in competitive International football we marvel at the differences in technique and application. 
    I am sure that applying continental techniques to work hand in hand with the more physical approach that can be had in English football is surely going to make our youngsters better footballers.
    Pablomoorlands
  • Well we aren’t a traditional English physical football academy. Our tradition is more about developing technical footballers rather than the more traditional physical football that English teams have developed.

    You don’t need formal arrangements to visit, meet and discuss with academies from other countries alternative approaches and strategies.

    You get these informal link up suggestions in lots of different industries and unless there is some specific hard edged reason for the link, it rarely amounts to much.

    If as I and @Jackareme suggests there are some other more substantial reasons for the link, then that makes some sense, otherwise I still don’t see the need.


  • I hav'nt suggested we are a traditional English physical based academy only that the physicality experienced by so many talented academy graduates out on loan early in their career has usually added another dimension to their game. There have been many academy youngsters from PL academies who have added another string to their bow out on loan and gone on to make a big impression in the PL. Reece James was one such example last year at Wigan and young Sterling is there this season from Chelsea. 

    As for our perceived tradition in developing more technical players is there really any compelling evidence of that during the last 5 years. Can Barnsley be any different in bringing John Stones and Mason Holgate through their academy than our Joe Rodon and Connor Roberts? Joey was in the system way before Roberto arrived.

    There is very little evidence that we are developing technical footballers in the vein that Roberto, Brendan and yourself demand and that can't all be placed at a lack of funding. 
  • @Colin_swansea

    I agree wholeheartedly with your last couple of posts.

    I believe it is a cultural issue. Unfortunately, though we’ve seen massive progress in the last 20/30 years with the early pioneers like Gullit at Chelsea and Wenger at Arsenal right through to the likes of Klopp and Guardiola now, there is still a dinosaur minority holding British football back.

    I’m talking about the likes of Allardyce, Pulis, Mark Hughes. They were all brought up on the cabbage patch pitches of the 70s and 80s where let’s face it, you had to bloody kick it up in the air to get any joy. The problem with them is, they are resistant to change, football has moved on, they have not. Sadly, some chairmen in the last 20 years are equally prehistoric, giving them jobs because of some perceived notion ‘they get results’. Which is interesting, because in the last 5 or 10 years, their records are largely atrocious. 

    The most disappointing thing about them is that their ability to linger and con chairmen is they have given rise to a new generation of less than enlightened coaches like Monk, Dyche, and Rowett. They all talk a good game, but their teams are all awful 80s throwbacks, direct descendants of the Allardycian and Pulisian school of thought.

    Until these deeply ingrained attitudes die out, British football will always be lagging behind the rest of Europe who understand that it’s called football for a reason, not headball.
    deekaymoorlandsSeaJack
  • @Colin_swansea

    I agree wholeheartedly with your last couple of posts.

    I believe it is a cultural issue. Unfortunately, though we’ve seen massive progress in the last 20/30 years with the early pioneers like Gullit at Chelsea and Wenger at Arsenal right through to the likes of Klopp and Guardiola now, there is still a dinosaur minority holding British football back.

    I’m talking about the likes of Allardyce, Pulis, Mark Hughes. They were all brought up on the cabbage patch pitches of the 70s and 80s where let’s face it, you had to bloody kick it up in the air to get any joy. The problem with them is, they are resistant to change, football has moved on, they have not. Sadly, some chairmen in the last 20 years are equally prehistoric, giving them jobs because of some perceived notion ‘they get results’. Which is interesting, because in the last 5 or 10 years, their records are largely atrocious. 

    The most disappointing thing about them is that their ability to linger and con chairmen is they have given rise to a new generation of less than enlightened coaches like Monk, Dyche, and Rowett. They all talk a good game, but their teams are all awful 80s throwbacks, direct descendants of the Allardycian and Pulisian school of thought.

    Until these deeply ingrained attitudes die out, British football will always be lagging behind the rest of Europe who understand that it’s called football for a reason, not headball.
    hear hear @garythenotrashcougar

    And I love the phrase "dinosaur minority"
  • An example of what I mentioned in a previous post regarding the physicality of the game in this country and how it can add another dimension to youngsters cossetted in academy football was seen when Joe Rodon went to Cheltenham on loan 2 seasons ago, and that experience hasn't damaged his career. Hopefully the same will be said of another young prospect Joe Lewis when he returns from his loan spell at National League side Torquay United. Incidentally, under the same manager, Gary Johnson, that was in charge of Cheltenham when Joe went there.
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